Are you flu safe?

...Get the jab!

All health staff are offered the flu jab, protecting them, protects their patients and their families.

Anyone can get flu and it is unpleasant, but it can be more serious for certain people, such as:

  • people aged 65 or over
  • people who have a serious medical condition
  • pregnant women

The flu vaccine is offered free of charge to people who are at risk to ensure that they are protected against catching flu and developing serious complications.

You are eligible to receive a free flu vaccine if you:

  • are 65 years of age or over (including those who will be 65 by March 31 2013)
  • are pregnant (including women who become pregnant during the flu season)
  • have a certain medical condition (see below)
  • are living in a long-stay residential care home or other long-stay care facility (not including prisons, young offender institutions or university halls of residence)
  • are in receipt of a carer's allowance, or you are the main carer for an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if you fall ill
  • are a healthcare worker with direct patient contact or a social care worker

Speak to your GP about the flu vaccine if you are the parent of a child who is over six months old and has a long-term condition that is listed below. Your child's condition may get worse if they catch flu.

Should you have the flu jab?

flu

See your GP about the flu jab if you’re 65 or over, or if you have any of the following problems (however old you are):

  • a serious heart complaint
  • a chest complaint or breathing difficulties, including asthma,bronchitis and emphysema
  • serious kidney disease
  • diabetes
  • lowered immunity due to disease or treatment such as steroid medication or cancer treatment
  • if you have a problem with your spleen or you have had your spleen removed
  • if you have ever had a stroke