All A to Z Topics

Abdominal aortic aneurysm

Syndication_logo
Introduction
An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a swelling (aneurysm) of the aorta – the main blood vessel that leads away from the heart, down through the abdomen to the rest of the body.
Symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm
In most cases, an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) will cause no symptoms, unless it becomes particularly large.
Causes of an abdominal aortic aneurysm
The aorta is the largest blood vessel in the body. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when part of the aorta wall becomes weakened, causing it to bulge outwards to form an aneurysm.
Diagnosing an abdominal aortic aneurysm
An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) usually causes no symptoms. Therefore, they tend to be diagnosed as a result of screening, or during a routine physical examination when a GP notices a distinctive pulsating sensation in your abdomen.
Treating an abdominal aortic aneurysm
Treatment for an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) depends on several factors, including the aneurysm's size, your age and general health.
Preventing an abdominal aortic aneurysm
The best way to prevent getting an aneurysm, or reduce the risk of an aneurysm growing bigger and possibly rupturing, is to avoid anything that could damage your blood vessels.
"I was able to go back to my part-time job within just three weeks"
When trumpeter, Peter Cripps, had a CT scan for a kidney stone, an abdominal aortic aneurysm was also discovered.
See what the doctor sees with Map of Medicine
See what your doctor sees, find out what is happening with your Repair Of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm treatment and what the next steps might be.